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The IUP Journal of Structural Engineering :
An Analysis of Hydrated Lime Included Fly Ash Concrete Based on SEM
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Ordinary cement concrete has very low tensile strength which leads to the failure of concrete. It has been found that different types of fibers added in specific percentage to concrete improves the mechanical properties, durability and serviceability of the structure. It is now established that one of the important properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) is its superior resistance to cracking and crack propagation. In this paper, the effect of fibers on the strength of concrete for M40 grade has been studied by varying the percentage of fibers in concrete. The fiber content was varied by 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75% and 1% by volume of concrete. Cubes of size 150 mm 150 mm 150 mm were used to conduct the compressive strength before and after corrosion test. All the specimens were cured for a period of 3, 7 and 28 days before testing. A considerable reduction in corrosion potential was noticed. The results indicate that the strength degradation was marginal in the case of SFRC before and after accelerated corrosion test. The slump cone test results revealed that workability gets reduced with the increase in fiber content.

 
 

Concrete is a composite material containing hydraulic cement, water, coarse aggregate and fine aggregate. The resulting material is a stone-like structure which is formed by the chemical reaction of the cement and water. This stone-like material is a brittle material which is strong in compression but very weak in tension. This weakness in the concrete makes it crack under small loads at the tensile end. The formation of cracks is the main reason for the failure of the concrete. So to increase the tensile strength of concrete, a technique of introduction of fibers in concrete is being used. These fibers prevent the propagation of the cracks. These fibers are uniformly distributed and randomly arranged. This concrete is named as Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). The main reasons for adding fibers to concrete matrix is to improve the post-cracking response of the concrete, i.e., to improve its energy absorption capacity and apparent ductility, and to provide crack resistance and crack control. Concrete containing hydraulic25-34-10-A STUDY on partial cement, water, fine aggregate, coarse aggregate and discontinuous discrete steel fibers is called Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC).

 
 

Crimped steel fibers, Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC), Accelerated corrosion