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The IUP Journal of Law Review :
The Relationship Between Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment Among Faculty Members in Select Management Educational Institutions
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The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment among the faculty members of various management educational institutions of the Rayalaseema region in Andhra Pradesh. It was assumed that there had not been any similar research conducted on the faculty of management educational institutions in the Rayalaseema region of AP. Therefore, this study could make an important contribution in terms of research in management and organizational behavior. The objective of the study is to examine different variables that impact the job satisfaction of the faculty of management educational institutions. Additionally, the study also aimed at exploring the extent to which the faculties of the management educational institutions were committed to their organizations and satisfied with the different dimensions of their job.

 
 
 

Job satisfaction is one of the most researched areas of organizational behavior and education. It is perceived as an attitudinal variable measuring the degree to which employees like their jobs and the various aspects of their jobs (Spector, 1996; and Stamps, 1997). This is an important area of research because job satisfaction is correlated to enhanced job performance, positive work values, high levels of employee motivation, and lower rates of absenteeism, turnover and burnout (Begley and Czjaka; 1993; Tharenou, 1993; and Chiu, 2000).

Job satisfaction, according to McCormick and Ilgen (1985), is an association of attitudes held by an organization’s members. The way in which the employees respond to their work is an indication of the commitment towards their employers. Most of the employees opine that downsizing, rightsizing and reengineering give employers an opportunity to let go of those workers who are a liability to the organization.

“Organizations may implement a downsizing strategy to achieve an appropriate size, to restructure, to adjust to increasing technological advancements, to specialize in their core business, to become more flexible, to cut costs, to remain competitive, to speed the decision-making process, or to execute new ideas quickly” (Applebaum et al., 1997; Baron and Kreps, 1999; and Rabin, 1999). A growing body of evidence from both practitioners and academic literature, however, indicates that many downsizing efforts have failed to meet their objectives. In many cases, these failures have resulted in trouble. Downsizing tends to induce reduced commitment among survivors. Any downsizing process that employees perceived as unfair and unfavorable reduces their organizational commitment (Asuman and Ayse, 2009).

Like professionals in other occupations, job satisfaction in educators has been related to a number of factors. Researchers have linked job satisfaction to faculty attrition (Bobbitt et al., 1994; and Russ et al., 2001); demographic variables including age, qualification and gender (Peterson and Custer, 1994; Ganser and Wham, 1998; Castillo et al., 1999; and Eichinger, 2000); practice-related variables such as salaries, credentialing, opportunities for promotion, supervision, recognition, student behavior, working conditions, and sense of autonomy (Evans, 1998b; and Prelip, 2001).

Darling-Hammond (1995) states that rigid, bureaucratically-administered institutions have not succeeded in implementing change in education reform, while institutions using collective or collaborative problem-solving strategies based on an underlying sense of commitment have succeeded. Senge (1990) found that without commitment, substantive change becomes problematic. Hence, job satisfaction appears to be one of the important aspects of commitment.

 
 
 

Law Review Journal,Antecedents , Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment , Faculty Members, Select Management, Educational Institutions.