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The IUP Journal of Structural Engineering :
Strength and Durability Studies on Metakaolin and Crushed Sand-Based Concrete
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The paper investigates the suitability of metakaolin and crushed sand in production of concrete. The conventional concrete M20 was made using OPC 53 grade and the other mixes were prepared by replacing part of OPC with metakaolin and crushed sand. Cement was replaced with 10% of metakaolin for all percentage replacements of fine aggregate. The fine aggregate was replaced with crushed sand in five different proportions such as 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30%. The strength and durability properties of all specimens were compared with control specimen.

 
 

Concrete is one of the most common materials used in the construction industry. In the past few years, much research and modifications have been done to produce concrete which has the desired characteristics. There is always a search for concrete with higher strength and durability. In this context, blended cement concrete has been introduced to suit the current requirements. Cementitious materials, known as pozzolans, are used as concrete constituents, in addition to Portland cement.

Originally, the term pozzolana was associated with naturally formed volcanic ashes and calcined earth reacts with lime at ambient temperatures in the presence of water. Recently, the term has been extended to cover all siliceous/aluminous materials which in finely divided form and in the presence of water, will react with calcium hydroxide to form compounds that possess. When fine pozzolana particles are dissipated in the paste, they generate a large number of nucleation sites for the precipitation of the hydration products. Therefore, this mechanism makes paste more homogeneous. This is due to the reaction between the amorphous silica of the pozzolanic and calcium hydroxide produced during the cement hydration reactions. In addition, the physical effect of the fine grains allows dense packing within the cement and reduces the wall effect in the transition zone between the paste and aggregate.

 
 

Crushed sand, Durability, Metakaolin, Rapid penetration test, Sulphate attack