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The IUP Journal of Mechanical Engineering
The Effect of Condenser Temperature on the Evaporator and Condenser Section of PHP for Different Temperature Ranges: An Experimental Investigation
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Heat transfer plays an important role in the day-to-day life of humans in terms of science and technology. There is a vast literature available on the work done on heat transfer devices like heat pipe. In the paper, a multi-turn closed-loop PHP having 2 mm ID and 4 mm OD specifications is used in vertical position to compare its performance for three different working fluids, i.e., methanol, ethyl acetate and deionized water with different filling ratios (60% and 64%). From analyzing previous literature and continuous long experimental work on the designed closed-loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) setup, it is concluded that condenser temperature is the key parameter which affects the temperature difference (between evaporator temperature and condenser temperature) and is greatly responsible for the performance improvement of PHP because it is directly proportional to the heat transfer rate of PHP.

 
 

Heat transfer devices are mainly classified into two categories, i.e., active heat transfer devices and passive heat transfer devices. Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) is the novel member in the group of passive heat transfer devices developed by Akachi (1990). It is one of the latest types of efficient heat transfer devices having compact design, mini size and effective thermal performance (Wang et al., 2014). Its construction is very simple, possessing a capillary tube filled with liquid having a wickless structure, able to carry both sensible and latent heats through continuous pulsation of liquid and vapor slugs. Heat transfer in both looped and unlooped PHPs was mainly due to the exchange of sensible heat and higher surface tension resulted in a slight increase in total heat transfer (Zhang and Faghri, 2008). Really, PHP is a promising solution for small spaces with high heat flux electronic cooling because heat dissipation from the electronic chips increases sharply, but with the reducing of the physical size in PHP, no external power is required; bubbles (Lee and Kang, 1999) grown in the evaporator act as pumping/sucking elements. Due to the condensation process, these bubbles collapse and shrink in condenser. According to the types of applications required, PHPs are mainly of two types: open or closed-loop (Shafii et al., 2002) PHP. Akachi (1990) invented an increasingly promising technology, PHP, which is the latest addition to the group of two-phase passive heat transfer equipments (Xu et al., 2012),

e.g., heat pipes and another device, thermosyphon (Khandekar et al., 2008). Khandekar et al. (2008) described the heat transfer properties of Closed-Loop PHP (CLPHP) which is a modern entrant to the group of closed passive two-phase heat transfer technology. It highlights the thermal behavior of CLPHP for different filling ratios with respect to two different working fluids. Figure 1 depicts the different types of PHP used in the past. From these available types, a CLPHP design is selected for the experimental work after studying and comparing the efficiency of all types of PHP used in history. Finally, the fabricated CLPHP is used in this experimental work.

 
 

Mechanical Engineering Journal, Condensation, Filling ratio, Heat transfer, Closed-loop PHP, Temperature, Micro scale, Heat transfer, Electronics cooling, Evaporation