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The IUP Journal of English Studies :
Ecocriticism in Indian Fiction
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Ecocriticism, a literary theory, is crucial in the current scenario, as reading a literary work under ecocritical lens is one of the functions of ecocriticism. It not only magnifies the works that appreciate nature but also explores the linguistic and literary exemplifications of the environment. Writing about ecology and environment is documented in ancient Indian literature, hence ecocriticism is not new to Indian literary context. Ecological balance is vividly represented in the Sangam (Tamil) literature, for instance, detailing of Aintinai (five landscapes). In contemporary Indian writing, there seems to be an imbalance between fiction and nonfiction environmental writings. A focus on ecological imbalance due to urbanization and westernization is seen in many unexplored Indian novels. The number of nonfictional writings famed for their “green” concern is quite high compared to fiction. This paper reviews the literature on ecocritical studies and brings out the ecological aspects in Indian fiction.

 
 
 

Ecofriendly,” “Eco-consciousness,” and “Go Green” are some of the trending catchphrases for nearly a couple of decades. Unexpected natural calamities due to climate change, global warming, and pollution are the marked reason for the people’s concern about environmental issues. Recently, almost all the disciplines are tagged with “eco.” The word is derived from the Greek “oikos,” meaning house. The etymology of ecology defines “Ökologie” as “the study of a dwelling place,” where the study is not limited to science. Glotfelty (Glotfelty and Fromm 1996) defines ecocriticism as “the study of the relationship between environment and literature,” and William Rueckert (ibid.) expounds it as “application of ecology and ecological concepts to the study of literature.” Even after three decades, ecocriticism is still an expandable field. Unconfined by boundaries, the umbrella term “Ecocriticism” ramifies into Ecofeminism, Eco-Marxism, Deep Ecology, Ecosophy, Bioregionalism, and so on. Glotfelty and Fromm’s (1996) The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology elaborates on the theory’s evolution, scope, and facets. Garrard’s (2004) Ecocriticism is considered an introductory text book. According to Garrard (2004, 5),

Ecocriticism is unique amongst contemporary literary and cultural theories because of its close relationship with the science of ecology. Ecocritics may not be qualified to contribute to debates about problems in ecology, but they must nevertheless transgress disciplinary boundaries and develop their own “ecological literacy” as far as possible.

 
 

Journal of English Studies ,Contemporary Ecocriticism, Ecocriticism in Indian Literature,Ecocritical Views in Indian Writings.