IUP Publications Online
Home About IUP Magazines Journals Books Archives
     
Recommend    |    Subscriber Services    |    Feedback    |     Subscribe Online
 
The IUP Journal of Soft Skills
The Impact of Basic, Higher-Order Thinking and Affective Skills on Graduate Employability
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Graduate employability is an evaluation criterion for not only institutions but also in the states and countries all over the world. The state with better employability rate seems to be socially as well as economically sound than the others. Many researchers have arrived at different models of employability, each focusing on a variety of skills. Though the focus of all researchers is on skill development, the graduates are in ambiguity as to what skills to be developed by them. Cotton (2000) has eased the situation by developing a conceptual framework of employability skills focusing on three major skill sets, namely, basic skills, higher-order thinking skills and affective skills. This paper makes an attempt to test Cotton’s (2000) model among the undergraduates of arts and science colleges. The findings reveal that the three skill sets have a positive impact on the employability skills of the students. The study would be of benefit to the graduates in focusing on their skill development and for the institutions in designing their curriculum to bring out more number of employable graduates.

 
 

Employability has become the current concern of the entire world. It has turned out to be a predominant factor in determining the socioeconomic power of the nations. The conflict between employability and employment in the current scenario has moved to the extent of replacing the problem of ‘Employment’ with ‘Employability’. Irrespective of the wealth and power of the nations, employability has become a universal problem.

Employability is a combination of a variety of skills, abilities, knowledge, competencies, and capabilities that facilitates individuals not only to get employment, but also be successful and move up in their career ladder. “Employability” refers to “work readiness,” which means possessing the required skills, knowledge, attitude, and understanding that will help new recruits to make productive contributions to their organization immediately after appointment (Mason et al., 2006). Graduates are able to attain technical skills through their course of study in the academic institutions. But mere possession of technical skills fails to fetch an employment for an individual. Lack of necessary skills drives away the graduates from demonstrating their acquired knowledge and competencies before the employers.

 
 

Soft Skills Journal, Factor Analysis, Naming of Factors ,Multiple Regression Analysis, Higher-Order Thinking Skills.