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The IUP Journal of International Relations :
Linkage Between National Security, Human Security and Resource Scarcity: An Analysis of the Role of the UN and the NGOs
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The paper offers theoretical perspectives on global security in the 21st century. Traditional notion of security has changed dramatically. Today’s global flows of goods, services, finance and people highlight the many interlinkages in the security of all states and people. Economic liberalization and globalization in recent decades have created a new breed of threats to national and human security in the form of terrorist attacks, ethnic violence, epidemics and economic downturns. There is also a fear that existing institutions and policies are not able to cope with the weakening multilateralism, disregard for human rights, eroding commitment to eradicate poverty and deprivation, growing educated unemployment and the tendency to neglect global responsibilities in an increasingly integrated world. People throughout the world live under varied conditions of insecurity. There is the need for integrated global policies that focus on people’s survival, livelihood and dignity.

 
 
 

The year 1989 ushered in the most profound change in international relations since the end of World War I. For more than a century, international politics has been driven by the split between authoritarianism and democracy that was institutionalized at the Congress of Vienna in 1815. In 1990, the Cold War that divided the world into two ideological blocs ended, and there appeared to be an overwhelming consensus that the authoritarian alternative, in its traditional economic and political configuration, could not compete with flexible, pluralist political economic systems.

But human and civil rights were not everywhere triumphant. The collapse of communism resulted in resurgent ethnic nationalism. In Western Europe, the European Community experienced a severe setback in its progress towards economic and political unity. In West Asia, the power vacuum revived regional power rivalries.

Clearly, the end of the Cold War did not usher in a period of peace and stability, in which all nations could focus on the important issues—issues like saving the global environment, or developing appropriate industrial technologies and practices to promote sustainable development. In the 21st century, global politics can best be described as ‘schizophrenic’. The world order based on sovereign nation-states since the Treaty of Westphalia (1648) has been fatally undermined as Rosenau and others have termed the present state of prolonged insecurity and instability as “global chaos.”1

 
 
 

International Relations Journal,Linkage Between National Security, Human Security and Resource Scarcity , An Analysis of the Role of the UN and the NGOs.