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The IUP Journal of Knowledge Management :
The Role of Indigenous Knowledge and Coastal Resource Management in Addressing the Climate Change Impact on Southeastern Bangladesh
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Indigenous knowledge management is important for the purposes of conservation, sustainability and reduction of vulnerability due to climate change in coastal areas. The present study explores the utilization patterns and management aspects of natural resources, and economic valuation of the ecosystem services through indigenous knowledge practices in the southeastern coastal area of Bangladesh for adaptation to changing climate. The results of analysis demonstrate that local communities of coastal area are extremely dependent on coastal resources, in particular fishery resources. About 57% household heads have been directly involved in coastal fishing, followed by agriculture, aquaculture, and salt production. Southeastern coastal area of Bangladesh is endowed with a number of estuarine rivers that are rich in fish diversity and also mangrove ecosystem diversity. Teknaf Peninsula, which is one of the longest sandy beach ecosystems in the world, located in southern Bangladesh, has mineral resources and is a potential tourism spot. In fact, fisheries and other coastal resources management in the study area are not yet effective. There is ignorance among the resource users of the linkages between the various coastal ecosystems, but they do have vast traditional knowledge about the resources. Therefore, revitalization of environment-friendly traditional values and formulation of effective environmental protection policies are required to improve management that would promote ecological and economic benefits for local communities and national interests.

 
 
 

The practice of knowledge management continues to present a number of challenges. Some of these are undoubtedly due to the tensions posed by competing or even unclear objectives of integration processes for conservation of resource management. It is a general scenario that scientific research, natural resource management, conservation, development, self-determination, and advocacy for indigenous rights have all been legitimate drivers of efforts to integrate knowledge in response to climate change vulnerabilities in the coastal area. Coastal land is intensively used for agriculture, settlements, forests, shrimp ghers, water bodies and fisheries, salt production, industrial and infrastructural development and tourism. The coastal areas are important ecologically as they provide a number of environmental goods and services to people. They contain critical terrestrial and aquatic habitats, such as the mangrove forests, wetlands and tidal flats. Forming a highly coveted socio-spatial system, the coast is an area under pressure, where there are multiple conflicts of use (Bruckmeier, 2005). The study of these conflicts is a topical issue, with strong social, political and environmental challenges. Coastal areas have a diversity of different—sometimes complementary, sometimes conflicting—functions. Such areas are not only environmentally fragile regions, but they also offer many opportunities for both economic development and environmental sustainability. A balanced development of complex mutual interaction between man and nature in bio-geophysical systems presupposes feasible policy strategies which are compatible with human behavior and environmental sustainability. The latter may be defined as the ability of a natural system to maintain ecological processes and functions for an indefinite period of time. The notion of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) has been developed to focus on sustainability in coastal zones. It is characterized by a political agenda, which may include items such as industrial progress, transportation efficiency, human health, resource conservation, hydroelectric energy supply, recreational values, international importance of species in coastal zones, hazard risks, environmental quality, etc. (Cochrane, 2006).

 
 
 

Knowledge Management Journal,Addressing the Climate Change Impact on Southeastern Bangladesh, Interoperability/Collaboration Challenges, The Role of Indigenous Knowledge and Coastal Resource Management, Ecosystem services through indigenous knowledge practices .