iUP Publications Online
Home About IUP Magazines Journals Books Archives
     
Recommend    |    Subscriber Services    |    Feedback    |     Subscribe Online
 
The IUP Journal of Structural Engineering :
The Rheological Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Self-Compacting Geopolymer Concrete: A Microstructural Analysis
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Considering the need for developing an alternative construction material, the paper discusses the feasibility of alkali-activated Self-Compacting Geopolymer Concrete (SCGPC). The paper also presents the rheological behavior of fiber-reinforced SCGPC under the effect of steel fibers, dosage of SP and effect of extra water. Fluid-Binder (F/B) ratio of 0.6 with 1% of steel fibers with different dosages of superplasticizer, i.e., Glenium SKY 8630, was considered. The flow characteristics and compressive strength of the samples were studied. The results showed that with 6% and 5% of SP and 5% of extra water content, the mix was satisfying, the flowability properties and the compressive strength were maximum among all other mix proportions.

 
 

The generation of cement contributes not less than 5-7% of CO2 emission globally. In addition, huge amount of energy is additionally required for the generation of cement; also it contributes to greenhouse gas emission which is one of the greatest hazards to humankind on this planet today and has serious impact on biological community (Arioz et al., 2013). Nowadays, cement industries are making efforts to reduce the same and adopting new innovative process and enhancement in the process. One of the methods for reducing the emission of CO2 is replacing the cementitious material with fly ash, GGBFS, rice husk, etc. Fly ash is rich in silicon and aluminum as main constituents. It is a by-product from burning pulverized coal in electric power generating plants, and it is delegated as pozzolana which frame cementitious product at ambient temperatures (Arioz et al., 2013).

 
 

Self-Compacting Geopolymer Concrete (SCGPC), Superplasticizers, Compressive strength, Workability, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM).