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Welcome to the IUP Journal of English Studies
ISSN: 0973-3728
A ‘peer reviewed’ journal indexed on Elsevier,
and also distributed by EBSCO and Proquest Database

Sep'15

Previous Issues

The IUP Journal of English Studies, an academic initiative of the IUP, is an intellectual vehicle for informed critical evaluations of various areas of literature, English Language Teaching, translation studies relating to emerging and established genres. A fresh and invigorating evaluation of the contributions of writers and their significant writings are on offer in the Journal.

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  • British Literature
  • American Literature
  • Commonwealth Literature
  • Indian Writing in English
  • English Language Teaching
  • Comparative Literature
  • Translation Studies
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Simulacra of Identity Interstices: The Select Fiction of Chitra Banerjee and Jhumpa Lahiri
A Comparative Study of the Works of Anita Nair and Vikram Seth
Articulation of ‘Selfhood’ with the Intervention of Postmodernism
in Monica Ali’s In the Kitchen
Walking with Shadows and the Critique of the Evolutionary Character of Nigerian Narratives
Not a Literature of Lament: An Analysis of Emerging Themes and Trends in Tamil Dalit Literature
‘Invocation to Memory Enveloped by Fog’: An Introduction to Missing Person, the 2014 Nobel Laureate Modiano’s Nouveau Roman
Tess of the D’Urbervilles: An Eco-Critical Reading
Harsha’s Nāgānanda: An Appraisal in the Light of the Rasa Siddhānta
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Contents
(Sep 2015)

Simulacra of Identity Interstices: The Select Fiction of Chitra Banerjee and Jhumpa Lahiri

--K Narasimha Rao

This paper studies the select fiction of Chitralekha Banerjee Divakaruni and Jhumpa Lahiri and the ineluctable gaps that far speak of the divergent concerns of the postmodern and postcolonial times to evolve into meta-narratives. These writers who settled in the adopted nations charged up the myriad voices through centering the eloquent subaltern in their texts that crossed the fluid geographies and stern cultures. Their cultural worlds open up numerous possibilities of exploration which at best can be done through fictive narratives conveying the bespeaking realities through the powerful art of personalization. Both Divakaruni and Lahiri weave their stories with a realistic base—stories that speak so eloquently of the poignant self. This equipoise and the elegant literary transport of these writers make us revisit Homi Bhabha who turns to Levinasian ethics to evaluate, “the ‘art-magic’ of the contemporary novel lies in its way of ‘seeing inwardness from the outside.’”

Article Price : Rs.50

A Comparative Study of the Works of Anita Nair and Vikram Seth

--Jayashree Hazarika and Maya Vinai

Indian English literature has been steadily rising in eminence and two writers from this literature who have been recognized worldwide are Anita Nair and Vikram Seth. This paper presents a comparative study of these two writers. Both the writers are known to dabble with different genres with equal ease. Comparison is done on the aspect of travel that both Seth and Nair explores. Also, the paper emphasizes on the aspect of diaspora that seems to creep into their works, be it internal or external diaspora. The paper also examines how the motif of music and performing art are handled by both these writers.

Article Price : Rs.50

Articulation of ‘Selfhood’ with the Intervention of Postmodernism in Monica Ali’s In the Kitchen

--Abhisarika Prajapati

Monica Ali is known as a celebrated novelist of fiction in English. She is a Bangladesh-born writer and generally considered as an expatriate writer. Her first work of fiction Brick Lane presents a hot discussion on the emotional confusion of migrants and their world. Her third novel is far from these issues of diasporic sensibility but it presents an authentic picture of postmodern man who struggles to articulate his selfhood in the age of extremes and uncertainties. Monica Ali in this work has tried to examine man’s existential tension and conflicts related to his self and surrounding. The postmodern age is a time of incessant choosing and world-communication with an irony of lack of any definite communication. Amid the confused parody, the postmodernist sails often getting lost and coming to grief. This paper is a sincere attempt to make a survey of the characters of In the Kitchen for articulation of selfhood with the intervention of postmodernism in this paradoxical world.

Article Price : Rs.50

Walking with Shadows and the Critique of the Evolutionary Character
of Nigerian Narratives

--Ignatius Chukwumah

The emergence of full-blown representation of same-sex sexual relationship in the Nigerian literary tradition, courtesy of Walking with Shadows (2005), demonstrates a unique expression of the universal human will hitherto unknown in the Nigerian literary tradition. In analyzing Walking with Shadows, this paper argues that the Darwinist tendency, the evolutionary character embodied in conventional Nigerian narratives, is undermined in a number of respects. Since no same-sex sexual partners are primed by evolution for reproduction of humankind, this sexual phenomenon as demonstrated by the central character of this work is thus not only monumentally anti-evolutionary, but also immensely anti-continuation of the human occupation of the earth through biological reproduction. The above tendency partly accounts for why the major same-sex character’s kin and society cannot understand him. Walking with Shadows would be read against some conventional works in the tradition in order to show how the vital indices of identity and marked kinship lubricants indigenous to Africa, and hence Darwinian, are upstaged, as it also adds an interesting literary dimension to Nigerian literature by varying the usual.

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Not a Literature of Lament: An Analysis of Emerging Themes and Trends in Tamil Dalit Literature

--K A Geetha

The emergence of Tamil Dalit literature in the 1990s has led to a corpus of novels, short stories, poems and autobiographies. The general impetus in these writings is to expose the agonized and marginalized existence of Dalits. Are Tamil Dalit literary works merely “narratives of suffering”? This paper argues that Tamil Dalit literature is not merely a literature of lament and frustration, though pain and loss continues to be one of its major themes. The various contexts and heterogeneous experiences of Dalit communities make it a rich source of Dalit culture, tradition and language. This paper discusses the diverse themes and trends prevalent in Tamil Dalit literature and emphasizes the importance of translating these works into English.

Article Price : Rs.50

‘Invocation to Memory Enveloped by Fog’: An Introduction to Missing Person,
the 2014 Nobel Laureate Modiano’s Nouveau Roman

--P Suneetha

Robert Modiano, a well-known novelist in France but not highly known anywhere else, won the most prestigious French prize the Prix Goncourt in 1978 for his novel Missing Person. The Nobel Academy awarded him the 111th Nobel Prize for Literature in 2014. His novel Missing Person, an unconventional detective, is about Guy Roland (Jimmy Pedro Stern/Pedro McEvoy), the protagonist and a victim to amnesia, who loses his memory and ventures to know about himself. As a pragmatic practitioner of ‘meditation on identity,’ he turns to solving his own mystery. Like a seeker, he makes full use of former Detective Agency’s files including directories, yearbooks, photographs, police files, vague testimonies and newspaper clippings of all kinds going back half a century and making a rigorous search by discontinuity and turbulence, of knowing about himself and his past. In the end, he realizes that the person he is seeking will never be found, his identity as ephemeral as “the sand holds the traces of our footsteps but a few moments.” This elegant novel runs like a typical Nouveau Roman as many issues remain mostly unresolved and unanswered. With its intricacies and subtleties and its colloidal and unadorned prose style, “la petite musique”, as the French say, the novel like Marcel Proust’s: À larecherche du temps perdu conveniently releases the creative energies of past experience from the hidden store of the unconscious.

Article Price : Rs.50

Tess of the D’Urbervilles: An Eco-Critical Reading

--Ram Narayan Panda

Thomas Hardy’s epoch-making novel Tess of the D’Urbervilles had triggered controversies of different kinds with regard to religion and sexuality. But in the wake of the rise of interest in ecology and its concomitant bearing on hermeneutics, Tess of the D’Urbervilles warrants re-explication of the text in the light of the twin notions of anthropocentrism and non-anthropocentrism. This paper puts together observations oriented to demonstrating how the twin notions operate interpenetrated.

Article Price : Rs.50

Harsha’s Nāgānanda: An Appraisal in the Light of the Rasa Siddhānta

--GRK Murty

Vākyam rasātmakam kāvyam’—Rasa is the soul of poetry, says Acarya Viswanatha in his Sahityadarpana. Indeed, Rasa was accepted as the fundamental element of poetry much before even Bharatamuni, the author of Nātyaśāstra. Taittīriyopanisad says: “raso vai sah, rasam hyevāyam labdhavānandī bhavāti”1—supreme is the essence of rasa and therefore wherever humans find rasa, they become immersed in it, experiencing bliss. And thus there is no wonder if Bharatamuni said, “nahi rasādrte kaścidarthah pravartate”2— nothing in drama is pravrtta—attained without rasa. Bharatamuni has also explained the process of accomplishment of rasa: “yathā hi nānā vyañjanausadhidravyasanyogād rasanispattih / … /tathā nānābhāvopagatā api sthāyino bhāvā rasatvamāpnuvantī”3—just as spices and herbs together enhance the taste of food, likewise Bhāvas (emotions) and Rasa embellish each other. Against this backdrop, an attempt is made here to examine how Harsha accomplished rasanispatti in his play, Nāgānanda.

Article Price : Rs.50

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Automated Teller Machines (ATMs): The Changing Face of Banking in India

Bank Management
Information and communication technology has changed the way in which banks provide services to its customers. These days the customers are able to perform their routine banking transactions without even entering the bank premises. ATM is one such development in recent years, which provides remote banking services all over the world, including India. This paper analyzes the development of this self-service banking in India based on the secondary data.

The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is playing a very important role in the progress and advancement in almost all walks of life. The deregulated environment has provided an opportunity to restructure the means and methods of delivery of services in many areas, including the banking sector. The ICT has been a focused issue in the past two decades in Indian banking. In fact, ICTs are enabling the banks to change the way in which they are functioning. Improved customer service has become very important for the very survival and growth of banking sector in the reforms era. The technological advancements, deregulations, and intense competition due to the entry of private sector and foreign banks have altered the face of banking from one of mere intermediation to one of provider of quick, efficient and customer-friendly services. With the introduction and adoption of ICT in the banking sector, the customers are fast moving away from the traditional branch banking system to the convenient and comfort of virtual banking. The most important virtual banking services are phone banking, mobile banking, Internet banking and ATM banking. These electronic channels have enhanced the delivery of banking services accurately and efficiently to the customers. The ATMs are an important part of a bank’s alternative channel to reach the customers, to showcase products and services and to create brand awareness. This is reflected in the increase in the number of ATMs all over the world. ATM is one of the most widely used remote banking services all over the world, including India. This paper analyzes the growth of ATMs of different bank groups in India.
International Scenario

If ATMs are largely available over geographically dispersed areas, the benefit from using an ATM will increase as customers will be able to access their bank accounts from any geographic location. This would imply that the value of an ATM network increases with the number of available ATM locations, and the value of a bank network to a customer will be determined in part by the final network size of the banking system. The statistical information on the growth of branches and ATM network in select countries.

Indian Scenario

The financial services industry in India has witnessed a phenomenal growth, diversification and specialization since the initiation of financial sector reforms in 1991. Greater customer orientation is the only way to retain customer loyalty and withstand competition in the liberalized world. In a market-driven strategy of development, customer preference is of paramount importance in any economy. Gone are the days when customers used to come to the doorsteps of banks. Now the banks are required to chase the customers; only those banks which are customercentric and extremely focused on the needs of their clients can succeed in their business today.

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