Home About IUP Magazines Journals Books Archives
     
A Guided Tour | Recommend | Links | Subscriber Services | Feedback | Subscribe Online
 
The IUP Journal of Genetics & Evolution
In-Vitro Conservation of Tylophora indica: A Threatened Medicinal Plant
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A protocol for in-vitro conservation of Tylophora indica (Burm. f.) Merrillan important medicinal planthas been developed. T. indica plants cultured in MS medium supplemented with 0.54 ÁM NAA and 4.44 ÁM BAP produced 5-10 shoots within a period of two months. For in vitro conservation studies, experiments were carried out in 2-3 week maintained vitroplants under Standard and Reduced Culture Conditions (SCC and RCC). Vitroplants could be successfully conserved in Full Strength MS Medium (FMS) under SCC for six months without subculture with full potential to regenerate, producing viable shoots and nodes.

 
 
 

The root production remained unaffected due to conservation, showing high rooting activity in mannitol and low temperature treatments. Preset low temperature regimen (15 oC and 10 oC) and reduction in media constituents do not appear to favor conservation, although the former accomplished conservation levels equal to FMS under SCC.

Tylophora indica (Burm. f.) Merrill is a perennial branching climber found in several parts of India. This species, commonly known as `antamul' grows as wild climber in Assam, West Bengal, Orissa and the peninsular India, ascending to an altitude of 900 m. The distribution is mostly restricted in the southern region of the country where it has been reported to thrive best in sandy soil. This indigenous medicinal plant has multiple uses. The roots and leaves of this plant have long been used for the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough, dysentery, rheumatic gout pains and hydrophobia (Anonymous, 1976). Roots are known to possess bacteriostatic properties (Bhutaniet al., 1985). The roots and leaves are emetic, useful in overloaded states of the stomach and other cases requiring the use of emetics. Leaves and roots have often been employed as substitute for Ipecacuanha. The root of the plant contains a potential antitumor alkaloid tylophorinidine, besides these other alkaloids such as tylophorine and tylophorinine found in other parts of the plant (Chitnis et al., 1992). The pharmacological activity is attributed mainly to the alkaloids tylophorine and tylophorinine and therefore it was suggested to be a good natural preservative for food.

In addition to its therapeutic value, the plant is reported to yield a fine silky and strong fiber, which may be useful in the manufacture of extra fine fabrics (Anonymous, 1976). Due to overexploitation and lack of organized cultivation the wild populations of this species have rapidly declined. The earlier studies on T. indica have largely been restricted to monitor alkaloid synthesis in callus and protoplast cultures and regenerated plants (Rao et al., 1970; and Rao and Narayanaswamy, 1972). A protocol for rapid in-vitro multiplication of T. indica was developed (Sharma and Chandel, 1992). In-vitro conservation studies are essential because it is figuring in the red list of medicinal plants of India, natural populations are dwindling and therapeutic values are well-established, mostly from roots and leaves (FRLHT, 1999).

For rare species, which are declining, in situ conservation alone may not provide adequate protection (Rajora and Mossier, 2000). Tissue culture and cryopreservation provides excellent avenues for ex situ conservation of this species. Low temperature storage of in-vitro plant material is commonly used for conservation of plant germplasm (Pruski et al., 2000). This method, if properly adjusted to specific genotypes can substantially reduce labor and media costs. The present paper deal with in-vitro regeneration and conservation of T. indica, as a possible approach to conserve genetic diversity of this species.

 
 
 

Genetics & Evolution Journal, Pharmacological Activity, Alkaloid Tylophorinidine, Callus Systems, Pharmaceutical Industry, Tylophora Indica, Amoebicidal and Bacterial Activities, Cell Metabolic Activity, Mannitol Treatment, Mercuric Chloride, Tylophorinidine.