Mar'22


The IUP Journal of English Studies

ISSN: 0973-3728

A 'peer reviewed' journal indexed on Elsevier, and also distributed by EBSCO and Proquest Database

It is a quarterly journal for informed critical evaluations of various areas of Literature, English Language Teaching, Translation studies relating to emerging and established genres. A fresh and invigorating evaluation of the contributions of writers and their significant writings are on offer in the Journal. Also deals with Linguistics and literature; Literary and literary theory; Bhasa studies, etc.

Privileged access to Online edition for Subscribers.

Focus Areas
  • British Literature
  • American Literature
  • Commonwealth Literature
  • Indian Writing in English
  • English Language Teaching
  • Comparative Literature
  • Translation Studies
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Using Prezi in Learning English Vocabulary: A Study of Chinese Secondary School Students' Acceptance and Achievement
50
Enumerating Identities in the Certitude of African Indigeneity in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Americanah
50
A Comparative Study of English Achievement Test Scores Based on Flipped Classroom and Traditional Teaching Methods Reflecting Per Capita National Income: Meta-Analysis 2015-2020
50
Of Personification and Equilibrium: An Ecosophical Appreciation of the Agency of the Earth in N K Jemisin's Broken Earth Trilogy
50
Online Reading Habits and L2 Vocabulary Size: A Correlation
50
Imagining the Middle East: Migration and Malayalam Cinema
50
Exploring the Surveillance Culture: A Study of the Social Media Syndrome of the Present Day with Special Reference to George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty Four
50
Beyond Apartheid: A Study of Nadine Gordimer's Post-Apartheid Fiction
50
Magical Realist Topos as Narrative Expression: Textualized Reader Transcends the Study of Possible Worlds
50
Kalidasa and Aesthetico-Romantic Inventories in English Romantic Poetry
50
Cultural Issues in the English Translation of Dogri Play Bawa Jitto
50
Searching for Self in Scattered Shards: Jhumpa Lahiri's Postmodern Narrative Whereabouts
50
Capitalism and the Fall of the American Dream: A Marxist Reading of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Winter Dreams
50
Binary of Justice/Injustice in Literary Imagination: A Critical Reading of Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance
50
Crossing Caste Boundaries: Exploring Cognitive and Affective Empathy in Srividya Natarajan and Stephen Anand's Graphic Novel Bhimayana
50
Intertextuality in McEwan's Nutshell
50
     
Articles

Using Prezi in Learning English Vocabulary: A Study of Chinese Secondary School Students' Acceptance and Achievement
Rachel Maryanne and Siti Hajar Halili

This paper investigates the Chinese secondary school students' learning achievement and acceptance towards using Prezi in learning English vocabulary. The UTAUT theory was used in determining the students' acceptance in learning English vocabulary. Using the purposive sampling method, 60 respondents were selected from a Chinese secondary high school in Kluang, Johor. This quasi-experimental research uses non-equivalent groups and pre- and post-tests design to assess the students' achievement. A total of 30 students participated in the survey for the experimental group, employing a 15-item questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS software with descriptive analysis and paired t-test. The results of this study demonstrated that students showed better score achievement and had positive acceptance towards using Prezi in learning vocabulary.


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Enumerating Identities in the Certitude of African Indigeneity in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Americanah
Justy Joseph, Nirmala Menon and Padmanabhan B

African immigrants across the world are identified with their ancestors who were oppressed. They create anti-racist racism for themselves with the fear of corresponding to the stereotypes set by the dominant culture. But they end up perceiving their hybrid identities in the certitude of being black in an active state of kinship. The novel Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a tale about being a black immigrant in the 21st century. Adichie disintegrates the promised land myth of America and proposes that the indigenous past is central to the identity of immigrants throughout her novel. This paper aims to analyze the entangled cultural experience associated with dislocation, redefinition of indigenous identity through black consciousness, formation of a hybrid identity through afropolitanism and the 'wound of return' while settling back in the native space in the novel Americanah.


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A Comparative Study of English Achievement Test Scores Based on Flipped Classroom and Traditional Teaching Methods Reflecting Per Capita National Income: Meta-Analysis 2015-2020
Dinachandra Singh Chingakham

This meta-analysis study tried to find whether the economic development of nations impacts the achievement test scores based on flipped classroom English teaching in comparison with traditional teaching methods over the period 2015 to 2020. The study analyzed English achievement test scores from eight countries-Indonesia, Iran, Turkey, China, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, South Korea, and the USA. The study included 69 datasets derived from primary studies, and the collected data were analyzed using RevMan 5.4.1 software under random-effects model settings with p < 0.05 and at 95% CI. The findings showed that the traditional method was more significantly effective in English achievement scores with an overall effect of z = 9.58 (p < 0.00001). The traditional method was significantly more effective in all countries, except for South Korea where the flipped classroom was significantly more effective than the traditional teaching method. The findings showed that the per capita national income (GDP per capita) did not correspond in predictable pattern to the English achievement test scores of the students under the flipped classroom method. The findings would help teachers and educators in better understanding flipped classroom method.


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Of Personification and Equilibrium: An Ecosophical Appreciation of the Agency of the Earth in N K Jemisin's Broken Earth Trilogy
Goutam Karmakar and Indrajit Patra

The paper seeks to analyze N K Jemisin's trilogy Broken Earth series, namely, The Fifth Season (2015), The Obelisk Gate (2016) and The Stone Sky (2017), from an ecosophical perspective based on the concept of ecosophy which is first introduced by Norwegian deep ecologist Arne Naess and French semiologist and philosopher Felix Guattari. By taking Jane Bennett's theory of vital materialism and James Lovelock's Gaia Hypothesis as the point of departure, this paper explicates the role of the agency of Earth as a totalizing, self-aware and sentient system. Both these theories aim to assert the agency of the Earth as a sentient being capable of organizing, feeling, and responding to external forces and maintaining its equilibrium. Furthermore, the study attempts to show how these novels not only impress us as a planetary-scale, speculative science-fictional epic spanning almost 40,000 years of history, but also present a warning against our technological arrogance and hubris which is the main obstacle in our way of realizing and appreciating the globally interconnected mode of existence of all flora and fauna as well as non-living entities on the planet.


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Online Reading Habits and L2 Vocabulary Size: A Correlation
Alice Su Chu Wong and Jocelyn Yee Vun Lee

A sizable number of studies have been done on English Language Learners' (ELL) reading habits. While many of these studies were done in English-speaking countries, very few empirical investigations have been done in the Asian context. The present study aims to investigate the online reading habits of ELL first year diploma students in Malaysia, their vocabulary size and the correlation between the two. Using a mixed method of an online reading survey, a qualitative online interview and a series of vocabulary tests (receptive and productive), the study discovered that 91% of students have read English online materials and 79% preferred getting online resources to do their assignments. Yet, almost half of the participants reported that they did not like to read long articles online. The results also revealed that students had difficulties doing the University Word List for receptive vocabulary test, and overall, students had difficulties in the productive vocabulary level test beyond the 2000 level. These findings suggest that online reading habits may hinder or promote the acquisition of receptive and productive vocabulary.


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Imagining the Middle East: Migration and Malayalam Cinema
Sathyaraj Venkatesan and Rajesh James

Middle East (ME) migration is a recurrent theme in Malayalam cinema. This paper analyzes four decades of Malayalam cinema's engagement with ME migration in order to conceptualize its multiple imaginings and to investigate geopolitical experiences and practices of this trend in Kerala. Accordingly, these films can be broadly classified into three major categories: (a) ME as a site of emancipation and economic empowerment; (b) ME as a 'haunting presence,' thus problematizing the earlier abstractions of the region as a safe place; and (c) ME as 'precarious presence.' In so doing, the paper not only identifies and differentiates key shifts in the representation of ME migration in Malayalam cinema, but also teases out the complex stories of desire, space, and geography.


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Exploring the Surveillance Culture: A Study of the Social Media Syndrome of the Present Day with Special Reference to George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty Four
Md Sarfaraj Nawab and Asrin Khatun

George Orwell in his novel 1984, also written as Nineteen Eighty Four, has speculated about a future where one "Big Brother" will constitute the center head of a state. People in this state are purported to be continuously monitored and controlled by a 24x7 surveillance system. Such a vigilance culture is likely to drastically change the ways people behave by manipulating them to follow some dictated disciplines. This paper attempts to address and unravel the surveillance culture effectuated by a high-tech digital life where we find ourselves today. Here we argue that the instantaneous engagement of common people with social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter have made them vulnerable to surveillance politics. By drawing intuitions from the said novel, the contrapuntal study will discuss certain facts of the present time and the fictitious forebodings of the past. The study investigates how people have created multiple identities for themselves and also a bubble universe around themselves. The social media syndrome of the people of a digitized society is underscored here through a critical engagement with Orwell's seminal text, 1984.


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Beyond Apartheid: A Study of Nadine Gordimer's Post-Apartheid Fiction
Kusha Tiwari

This paper examines 'freedom' and its state of arrival in Nadine Gordimer's post-apartheid fiction. It explores the possibility of a sense of freedom in the 'white' author, who has shed the burden of writing for a cause in order to prove her allegiance to the truth. In the post-apartheid scenario, Gordimer is liberated of the critical and social pressure to respond actively to the local dilemmas and social conflicts. She experiments with literary conventions and techniques so as to create a euphoric blend of humanistic, sociological and socio-political narratives. There are alternative endings, overlapping and fragmented narratives, intertextual references, multilayered structures, allegoric and symbolic allusions, varied motifs and metaphors that enhance Gordimer's aesthetic endeavor and widen the narrative perspective. She expands her imagination in the post-apartheid era and creates fiction that moves through differing cultural contexts, blurring different temporal and spatial boundaries.


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Magical Realist Topos as Narrative Expression: Textualized Reader Transcends the Study of Possible Worlds
Ritu Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to explore and explicate the process of textualization. Eventually, it elucidates the cultural, psychological and epistemological innuendo of magical device. For illustration, the study takes the narrative: "Press the Sap, Light the Lamp" by Vijaydan Detha. Then, it looks into the selected text, which fundamentally originated from oral narrative (Rajasthani), through the lens of twentieth century phenomenon, primarily, the postmodern era, rather more precisely the post-war period. The analysis anchors the focus on the condition of textual magic in the selected text. It also prompts to look into other magical realist practitioners in the textual world. Moreover, it focuses on the open-ended element in the selected narrative entailing not only the textualization of real reader (outside the text) but also of the readers inside the text (fictional reader). The assertion primarily emphasizes that textualization appears as an important tool in depicting possible worlds, without which the poetics of postmodernism and magical realism would remain less expressive.


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Kalidasa and Aesthetico-Romantic Inventories in English Romantic Poetry
Bhavatosh Indra Guru

Romanticism is an effort to find a true meaning of 'I'. Accordingly 'I' undergoes transformation numerous times. Inadvertently the greatest representation of 'I' is obtained in the form of the creation of absolutes in respect of Beauty, Truth and Reality. Each comes to be illustrated in the continuity obtained in the description of Nature, Female, Universe and Divine. In this regard, the earliest and, by far, the greatest example of this must be of Kalidasa (Indian dramatist and poet of antiquity). Kalidasa could be credited to have established the tradition in romanticism to discover the totality of romantic constructs such as beauty, truth and reality to the extent to which continuity in each is obtained and, in all fairness, bliss is underlain. The English romantics like Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats and Shelley precisely offer committed interpretation to such modes of conceptualization of beauty, truth and reality. William Wordsworth, for example, would locate knowledge in harmony with the Divine and thus anticipates the eternal. Coleridge realizes the consideration with the projection of virtue and evil in the finality of essence. Keats, however, actualizes the representation by fully transmuting object into subject and Shelley finally undertakes to revive the primordial perfection inherent upon humanity. In each such case, Kalidasa could be said to have established new bearings and through the English romantics, the discourses continue and prosper.


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Cultural Issues in the English Translation of Dogri Play Bawa Jitto
Vandana Sharma and Shachi Sood

This paper looks at the practice of translation as a cultural activity foregrounding the fact that language and culture are intricately connected. Literary translation involves various challenges, wherein finding the cultural equivalence is of prime importance. Ostensibly, applying an appropriate translation strategy and approach is another significant task. This necessitates an in-depth understanding of concepts of translation studies such as equivalence, domestication and foreignization. Drawing on insights from these concepts, this paper attempts a critical assessment of the English translation of Ramnath Shastri's acclaimed play Bawa Jitto (1599) in terms of cultural issues in translation. Further, the paper examines the experience of both the translator and the reader, who in this paper are the author and the co-author, of translating and reading the text in its source language, that is Dogri, and its target language, that is, English.


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Searching for Self in Scattered Shards: Jhumpa Lahiri's Postmodern Narrative Whereabouts
Jagdish Batra

Jhumpa Lahiri has been hailed for the authentic portrayal of diasporic life of the people from the Indian subcontinent settled in the US. In her earlier works, she had focused more on the externals so that the internal was obliquely revealed. In the novel Whereabouts (2021), however, Lahiri focuses more on the inner thoughts and sentiments of a protagonist whose nationality does not count for much. The narrative directly reveals the co-relation between the external stimuli and the resultant inner reaction which leads to self-realization. Lahiri's narrative, as always, is delicate and shorn of linguistic flourishes, and yet highly successful in retaining the interest of the reader.


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Capitalism and the Fall of the American Dream: A Marxist Reading of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Winter Dreams
Tamador Khalaf Abu-Snoubar, Nazzem Attiyat and Issam Aldawkat

The paper describes Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Winter Dreams from a Marxist perspective. It talks about Marxism from a twofold perspective. First, Fitzgerald creates elaborate geographical and structural maps that delineate where the bourgeoisie and proletariat begin and end. For instance, the communities of West and East Egg would qualify as the proverbial American dreamland, a place of wealth and higher aspirations, while the Valley of Ashes symbolizes proletariat poverty and exploitation. Second, Fitzgerald shows that the protagonists of these stories experience eventual ruin, partly because of their consumerist and materialist orientations and ambitions. In other words, it is precisely this need to acquire material wealth that drives characters to ruination, leading to Gatsby's death and Dexter's unhappiness, as he realizes that wealth cannot offer spiritual satisfaction. The Marxist reading will consider both features as fundamental to Fitzgerald's broader goals to situate capitalism within a rapidly-declining, opulent America. While Fitzgerald may not have been an out-and-out Marxist, and indeed, such assertions remain controversial to make, there was certainly something in capitalism that he saw as failing.


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Binary of Justice/Injustice in Literary Imagination: A Critical Reading of Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance
Satyanarayan Tiwari and Ajay K Chaubey

Hegemony in society and disillusionment of individuals is a legitimate subject-matter of critical inquiry in literature and other cultural forms as the same have enlightened the human consciousness from time to time. The writers, thinkers, painters, filmmakers and so on have been cognizant of justice/injustice in literature, culture, politics and society. Rohinton Mistry is one such author who catches our attention for the reason that his fictions portray the quintessence of individuals and unfold several stories of melancholy and mayhem. The present paper critically traces the trajectory of Mistry's magnum opus, A Fine Balance (1995), and explores the unexplored binaries of justice/injustice in it. The paper is a humble attempt to answer the questions as to how political polarization, communalism, exploitation of subalterns and discretionary power enlarge the circumference of iniquity in society and in what way do those subjugated share justice among them. Simultaneously, the paper also underscores the encounter between 'misbalanced' psyche of people and the collective consciousness of society, which is often debated in media and academia.


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Crossing Caste Boundaries: Exploring Cognitive and Affective Empathy in Srividya Natarajan and Stephen Anand's Graphic Novel Bhimayana
Kabita Mondal

Eminent theorists of empathy, such as Robert Vischer, Edward Titchener, Theodor Lipps, Vernon Lee and Wilhelm Worringer, inclined to relate visual stimulation to the empathic response. Dealing with the heartrending accounts experienced by the Indian social reformer B R Ambedkar as an untouchable in his childhood narrated in his autobiographical notes, Srividya Natarajan and Stephen Anand's graphic novel Bhimayana delineates the difficulties of combating caste prejudice and bigotry endured by Ambedkar in particular and Dalits in India in general, with coeval accounts of the evil social custom of untouchability and marginalization. As vision is a prime empathic sense, it is a subtle and acute job on the part of the author to enable a reader to share feelings through the art and mechanism of narration which is known as "narrative empathy." The present paper attempts to explore how through the subtle use of visual imagery and metaphors, and emotionally evocative narrative technique, Bhimayana recounts the comprehensive struggle against caste repression executed by home-grown scourges, and how it evokes cognitive and affective empathy in its readers, leading them to enhance their finer feelings through the unraveling of its visual language.


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Intertextuality in McEwan's Nutshell
Sonali Das

Intertextuality is a literary device that establishes an interrelationship between texts through intertextual figures like allusion, quotation, pastiche, translation and parody. The term is derived from the Latin word 'intertexto' and was popularized by Kristeva in the late 1960s. It signifies how one text is shaped by other texts. The study of intertextuality has come a long way from its theoretical roots in Saussure's semiology laid out in his Course in General Linguistics in 1916 to the actual inception of the concept by Kristeva in 1966 and on to Genette in 1982, which made the initial theoretical concept an applicable method. Genette has defined 'intertextuality' as the presence of one text in another. This paper makes a humble attempt to make an intertextual reading of Ian McEwan's Nutshell with Shakespeare's Hamlet. Nutshell is a retelling of Hamlet and shares its theme of betrayal, murder and revenge, but here the protagonist is an unborn fetus.


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